Letterman’s Ironweed

Have you ever grown the traditional ironweed? The first time that I met this plant was in 1998. I was amazed that Vernonia noveboracensis could grow to almost 10′ in height. I have since had a special place in my brain for Vernonia because it is a wonderful, native perennial that has striking, purple flowers in late summer. But, it is a huge plant. And if the soil is rich and moist, it can seed around the garden. Besides, there aren’t many plants that can step down a 10′ tall (or taller) perennial.

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Fast forward to last year when I first started working at CMBG. I was walking through the garden when I was stopped in my tracks by what appeared to be a purple flowered Amsonia hubrichtii. After looking closer at the flowers, I saw the label that said Vernonia lettermannii. My first thought was, wow, this is cool… a small Vernonia. This would be perfect for the garden. My second thought was wondering if this plant was named after David Letterman. It was actually named after George Letterman, a reclusive botanist who spent most of his life exploring for plants while living in a one-room shack in Missouri.

Letterman’s ironweed is found in the wild along rocky floodplains in Arkansas. It can withstand long periods of drought once established. An established clump can reach up to 30″ in height and width. We cut our plants back after they go dormant each fall.

Vernonia lettermannii

In late August and into early summer, Vernonia lettermannii is covered with purple flowers. These flowers are sought after by butterflies for nectar. One of the most successful cultivars is V. lettermannii ‘Iron Butterfly,‘ which was introduced by Dr. Allan Armitage from the University of Georgia. This selection is supposed to more upright than the straight species with even more flowers. We have a clump in our Alfond Children’s Garden. I will definitely keep an eye on it this fall to see how it compares to the species.

As you go around your garden this fall looking for holes to fill in your garden beds, consider Vernonia lettermannii for any open, sunny site.

-Rodney

Images: utgardens.tennessee.edu, bustaniplantfarm.com

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rodney eason

Rodney Eason - Director of Horticulture and Plant Curator at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, father of 4, husband to a Renaissance woman. I spent the first part of my life in North Carolina, the middle in Pennsylvania, and now I am determined to become a Mainer  while keeping my southern drawl. I consider the rhetorical question, "you're not from around here, are you?" a compliment. I love great gardens, beautiful plants, and inspiring architecture. Because of this, I am on a lifelong quest to find a garden that artistically combines beautiful plants while being centered around an evocative building. For me, this would be Beatrix Farrand's Dumbarton Oaks, with the plants of Lotusland and Chanticleer, around Fay Jones' Thorncrown Chapel. My wife and I are now making our new home and garden in a 130 year old New England house with a farmer's porch near the Damariscotta River in coastal Maine. When our kids get into college, we want to hike the Appalachian Trail as a family over a summer break. My likes (in random order): the smell of fresh basil and rosemary, bold foliage, India Pale Ale, good running shoes, Top Gear, the smell of New England in the fall (it reminds me a bit of English Leather, which my grandfather wore), and the sound of our family laughing together around the dinner table. I dream of one day owning an old Toyota 4X4 pick-up and seeing the Avett Brothers in concert.
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6 Comments

  1. Scott Weber on August 28, 2013 at 10:07 am

    I love Ironweed…but you’re right…it’s pretty big…and mine always flopped over by the time they bloomed. I was excited to get a variety of Vernonia lettermannii this spring and it’s such an improvement! Love the foliage (almost looks like Amsonia) and it’s just starting to bloom. I may have to find room for a few more 🙂

    • rodneyeason on August 30, 2013 at 7:02 am

      Right with you, Scott. I definitely want to add more in the future to different projects.

  2. Debbie Feely on August 28, 2013 at 10:21 pm

    Thanks for the introduction! I am looking for more late flowering perennials.

    • rodneyeason on August 30, 2013 at 7:00 am

      Debbie, thanks for leaving a comment and good luck with the Vernonia. Solidago, Aster, Chrysanthemum are just a few of the great fall flowering perennials.

  3. [email protected] Trekker on August 28, 2013 at 10:35 pm

    What a beautiful plant and a great garden tip. I am always looking for options for my garden.

    • rodneyeason on August 30, 2013 at 6:59 am

      Thanks, Charlie. Give it shot and let us know how it does in the PNW.

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